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Sam Holden - 70 still frames and 5 minutes 50 seconds of video

5:50, 2008, Video Art
Using a digital SLR, image capture software and a hidden video camera ’70 still frames and 5 minutes and 50 seconds of video’ highlights how much we simply don’t see when encountering
someone’s photographic reproduction and underlines how problematic photography can be as a representative medium.
DirectorSam Holden

CountryUnited KingdomEdition2008

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Interview

Who is Sam Holden?
I’m a 30 year old London-based visual artist



Your film is about?
How much we simply don’t see when encountering someone’s photographic reproduction and how problematic photography can be as a representative medium.



How did you start with film? And do you have an educational background in art or film?
This is my first video work. My background, both practical and educational, is in photography.



Could you explain how you work, what themes or concepts and what is important to you?
My work examines the representation of the self; exploring issues such as identity, hyperconsciousness, multiplicity, self-image and the image repertoire.



Where do you get your ideas or influences from?
Everyday events and experiences. However personal the experience, I try to make the work discuss wider experience, not simply my own.



How does the title relate to the work, and how do you find a fitting title?
It is descriptive.



How does content relate to the form of your work?
Content is everything, aesthetics follow.



How do you finance your projects (by yourself, sponsors or subsidy)?
I use the money I earn from freelance photography to fund my own projects.



Nowadays everyone with the right equipment can create videoart, good, bad or ugly?
Some is good, alot is bad. Some is unfortunate enough to be bad and ugly. It’s not the equipments fault, it’s the artists’. My only rule is that (with the very occasional exception) video should never last longer than 5 minutes (and 50 seconds).



Video broadcasting platforms on the internet, why or why not?
They’re a good way to view lots of work in a very short time.
On the flipside, the context in which work is viewed can often be an intergral part of the piece, so internet streaming can sometimes be less than ideal.



In what category would you place your work; cinema or art. And is there a difference between those?
Art.



How important is the reaction to your film by the audience?
I would hope that they find it an enjoyable and enlightening experience.



What is your next project about?
The relationship between our public and private selves. Same as ever.


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