/video/stills/david_sant_fractured_fractured-1.jpg

David Sant - Fractured

3:04, 2013, Experimental
 
Decisions about what to film within the confines of the specific parameters of the camera frame were determined as much by the decision to avoid filming what lay outside the periphery of that frame. This film explores and reworks perceptions of urban peculiarities found in an Inner Western Sydney landscape through ever shifting camera movements and unconventional editing techniques. Human artifacts in this landscape include such peculiarities as the desolate rooftops of multistorey car parks, street signage, telegraph poles, power lines, empty construction sites and shop front awnings. The re-working is a fractured spatio-temporal continuity that pursues, in the visual and auditory realm, a new mode of expression that seeks to expand cinematic thought.
DirectorDavid Anthony SantProducerDavid Anthony SantCameraDavid Anthony SantComposerNoise Research
 

CountryAustraliaEdition2013 Screenings2013. Video Screening: ‘Festival Images Contre Nature’ (13th edition): Organised by Association PSilo: Théâtre des Chartreux: Marseille: France. July 10 and 12.
2013: ‘The 11th Edition of flEXiff 2002-2022’: The Newington Armory: Sydney Olympic Park & Reading Cinemas: Auburn. September 20-22
2013: ‘BEAMS arts festival’ (2nd edition): Balfour Street and surroundings: Chippendale: Sydney. September 21.
2013: ‘Abstracta’ international abstract cinema and video art exhibition (8th edition): Casa del Cinema a Villa Borghese: Rome: Italy. October 10-11.
2013: Exploding Cinema: The Canterbury Arms: Brixton: London. November 8.
 

< overview

Interview

 
Who is David Anthony Sant?
Born in 1968, Sydney, Australia. Since 1984 I have incessantly created art works during periods of study and teaching. My film making achievements are recognised within a significant number of Australian, British, American and European film making collectives who regularly screen and showcase my work.



What is FRACTURED about?
Decisions about what to film within the confines of the specific parameters of the camera frame were determined as much by the decision to avoid filming what lay outside the periphery of that frame. This film explores and reworks perceptions of urban peculiarities found in an Inner Western Sydney landscape through ever shifting camera movements and unconventional editing techniques. Human artifacts in this landscape include such peculiarities as the desolate rooftops of multistorey car parks, street signage, telegraph poles, power lines, empty construction sites and shop front awnings. The re-working is a fractured spatio-temporal continuity that pursues, in the visual and auditory realm, a new mode of expression that seeks to expand cinematic thought.



How did you start with film? And do you have an educational background in art or film?
In 2001 I chose to work entirely in moving imagery. After many years of creating two-dimensional imagery the rapid advances in affordable digital technology allowed me to experiment with the creation of moving imagery. The videos I have directed and produced combine experimental visuals with experimental sound. I have a Bachelors Degree in Art Education and have many years of experience teaching Fine Art and Graphic Design in Secondary Schools both in Australia and in the U.K.



Could you explain how you work, what themes or concepts you use and what is important to you?
A subject that re-occurs in many of my films is the experience of location and space. These films are often films about space and spaciousness as experienced within urban environments. Every film I create is an attempt to innovatively explore the visual language of the moving image. My approach to film making can best be described as Extemporaneous Film Making



How long do you usually work on one project?
When filming a new project I consciously capture more than enough digital footage. I feel it makes sense to do this because filming digitally allows you to do this. Consequently, most films I create require extensive amounts of editing. On average, I will create between three to four films per year.



Do you carefully plan the production process or do you work more intuitive?
I try to always include an element of chance in my films. I try to ensure that this element is a part of the filming and/or editing process that I have little or no control over. Because I aspire to be an intuitive film maker I am self conscious about my production processes, particularly when they are becoming carefully planned and repetitive. At these moments I need to re-assess what I am doing and what the outcome is likely to be.



How does the title relate to the work, and how do you find a fitting title?
The title of this film relates to the ever shifting camera movements and unconventional editing techniques used within the film. I often find the experience of finding a title for a film as being difficult. This is because I consider attaching a title to an experimental film as being important because it can potentially define the concept behind the film.



Where do you get your ideas or inspiration from?
My interest in researching the way other artists’ use moving imagery and an ability to recall that research is my greatest influence.



How important is sound in film, and if you use sounds, do you create your own or use existing?
Sound is an element in all of the films I create. I appreciate the extra dimension it adds to the visuals. In some of my films the sound accompanies the visuals and sometimes the visuals accompany the sound. I tend to ask other artists who understand and create original experimental sound or music compositions to create the sound for my films. When I request their collaboration I let go of the project and allow the visuals to be steered in whatever direction the sound artist feels it should be taken



How does content relate to the form of your work?
The form of each film I create always takes into account the content of the film. I try to use form together with the content of the film to reinforce the concept of the film.



What possibilities of the web are yet to be explored?
The web is constantly evolving and adapting. I am yet to find truly inventive collaborative work between artists who use the web. I have concerns about the web being used to exploit the work of artists. Festivals and screenings of films created by artists nearly always offer nothing more than exposure for the artist. Artists are more than ever before pinning their hopes for success on the dream of being noticed and financed through the increase in exposure that the web claims to deliver. Advances in file transfer efficiency are making it easier for artists to distribute their films yet the chances of these artists ever making money from the increased distribution remains next to nothing. In many ways the global networking web is undermining the financing of artists and their work. Artists need to choose and distribute carefully.



Did the web changed your view on art, or your career?
The web has facilitated my interest in researching the way other artists’ use moving imagery and has provided me with the ability to store and recall that research when I require it. The web is an essential networking and promotional tool for all artists.



Where would you place your work; cinema or art. And what is the difference between those according to you?
My work is Art because unlike cinema it is not bound by convention.



How influential is the reaction to your film by the audience?
Attempting to articulate the concept behind an experimental film through the visual language of the film, the title and the synopsis, is confirming that the audience and the way it reacts to my film matters.



What is your next project about?
My next project is evolving and changing. As this creative journey continues my understanding of what I am trying to say becomes clearer and hopefully becomes evident in the outcome produced.

 

< overview
 
< Artists interviews